Gerry Busch’s hole in one

Gerry’s Ace on #1 hole, Cottonwood Golf Course Jan 31st 2017 ——–photo by Richard

 

 

The last day in January proved to be a good one for Gerry Busch,
She hit a nice shot right into the cup on the first hole of her round.

This feat was witnessed by her playing partners of the day, Don Reisberg, Bill Stewart, Richard Lampi and Doug Mazur.
This is Gerry’s second “Hole in one” on the cottonwood golf course,
her other Ace was scored on Hole # 4.

She now has the distinction of being the first golfer from the LaCopa group to score 2 aces.
Others from the Group who have got a hole in one are Gary Cook, Sid Bina, Joyce Foy

For those who are interested, she was using a seasoned, Pinnacle 3, and used it for the rest of the round.

just goes to show you that you don’t need a high priced ball.

Gerry Busch tames # 4 at cottonwood

Thanks to Sid and Joyce for the update.

 

On March 15 th , Gerry Busch made a hole in one on hole number 4 using a 5 wood. It was witnessed by her golf partner Bill Stewart. It was the second one this year, the fourth overall by our group and the second on hole #4 ( Gary, #9; Joyce, #4; Sid, #1). These people have/will have the names engraved on the plaques on the wall.

Gerry Busch hole in one on #4 cottonwood march 15 2016

Gerry has also been cooking up some good scores. Over the past 2 or 3 weeks she has had a total score, for the 9 holes, of 28 on two occasions. Other than Fred’s 29, I can’t think of any other scores in the twenties this year.

Sid Bina’s Ace and the rest of his round

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Sid started his epic round from the first tee, his shot hit the fairway in front of the green and the ball slowly rolled onto the green and right into the cup. Don Reisberg, Joyce Foy and George Coulson watched this from the tee.
with this excitement George and Don each shot a four and Joyce scored a 5 on the first hole.

On the second hole Sid was all pumped up and hit a couple of wayward shots and took a 5 on the hole, Joyce parred the hole and George and Don shot 4s.

Sid recovered with a par on # 3, along with George and Don Joyce took a 5.

On # 4 Sid hit the green and birdied the hole, Don parred the hole and Joyce and George each shot 4.
hole # 5 plays long, you have to hit across a canal onto a small green, George likes this hole and parred it. Don and Sid had 4s and Joyce took a 5.

#6 is 170 yards long, Don, Sid and Joyce took 4 and George recorded a 5 on this hole.

Don Led the way on the seventh hole with a birdie, George and Joyce shot a pair of three’s and Sid took a four count.

on the 200 yard eight hole George shot a par Don a 4, Joyce a 5 and Sid took a six.

# 9 is a 125 yarder which Joyce shot a 5, Sid and George took 4s and Don parred the hole to finish his round with a 33 which tied him with George and Sid.
Joyce took 5 strokes on this hole to finished her round with a 38.

It was a great day for the golfers to see a hole in one.

Congratulations Sid

The begining of golf

I do not think anyone really can say when the game of golf was first played, but there are many stories about the start, Robin Williams has a great story about the start of golf.

The Scott’s who are given credit for the game, organized a club in St. Andrews, Scotland in 1754 and called it the Society of St. Andrews Golfers.

Some 70 years of developing and expanding the game, King Willam 1V  became a patron of the club, and the name was changed to The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews.

I had an opertunity to see this golf club and it is really a historic place.

Phil Mickelson leads at the Northern Trust

LOS ANGELES – Phil Mickelson learned as a junior golfer to never underestimate anyone, no matter the size of his lead or the pedigree of his opponent.

And while the odds of Lefty finally winning in L.A. looked good as ever Saturday at the Northern Trust, where he shot a 1-under 70 for a one-shot lead overJeff Quinney, two holes showed how much work remains to add Riviera to his West Coast collection of trophies.

One came at the fabled par-3 sixth, where Quinney hit a seven-iron that he thought was headed for the bunker in the middle of the green, only to land just to the right and roll back into the cup for an ace. The other came at the end of the third round when Quinney holed a 35-foot birdie putt to close the margin to one stroke.

“If the guy is good enough to be in the last group, he’s obviously playing well enough to win,” Mickelson said. “I know that I won’t be handed anything tomorrow. I know how well Jeff is playing. And I know that there are guys that are right there and can shoot a low round tomorrow. It’s my job to go out and hit solid shots.”

Mickelson was at 11-under 202, and Quinney might be the only guy he has to worry about.

 
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John Rollins lost momentum with consecutive bogeys and shot 69, leaving him five shots behind. Scott Verplank overcame a four-putt from 30 feet on the fringe at the par-5 first for a 71 that put him at 208, along with Stuart Appleby (69) and Vaughn Taylor (71).

A year ago, Mickelson had a one-shot lead over Padraig Harrington with five experienced players separated by only three shots. He wound up losing in a playoff to Charles Howell III.

“I like it better this time,” Mickelson said.

And well he should.

Mickelson has 32 career victories, 15 of those coming in every West Coast Swing city but Los Angeles. He is 18-7 when he has at least a share of the lead going into the final round.

“Other than Tiger, he’s probably the next best front-runner,” Verplank said. “He’s awful good.”

Quinney, a former U.S. Amateur champion who took five years to reach the PGA Tour, has held the 54-hole lead only once, last year in Phoenix, and bogeyed the last two holes to finish third.

“He’s going to bring a lot to the table,” Quinney said. “I have to bring my best to the table.”

Quinney did not sound the least bit concerned about a four-shot deficit to Mickelson, saying after his second round that Riviera is not the type of course where one has to shoot 64 to make up ground.

Then, he looked as though he might do just that.

Quinney birdied the first hole with a long chip across the green on the par 5, then gained another shot when Lefty three-putted for bogey on No. 4. Quinney then holed a 20-foot birdie putt to reduce the lead to one-shot going into the sixth hole.

Then came an ace that he heard, but never really saw.

With a seven-iron from 163 yards, the ball landed to the edge of the bunker and trickled down toward the cup. Quinney couldn’t see because of the haze, but figured he was in decent safe and walked away from the tee. He looked over his left shoulder one last time, and his eyes grew wide when he heard an enormous cheer from the hill around the green.

He ran toward his caddie, unsure whether to hug or high-five, and it turned out to be a clumsy celebration.

“We need to get that organized,” he said.

That gave him the lead, but only for as long as Mickelson hit eight-iron to five feet and made birdie, putting both at 10 under.

“I thought that was as good of a response as I could have expected,” Mickelson said. “I thought that was a big 2 for me.”

They matched birdies at No. 10 – Quinney with a wedge to two feet, Mickelson by driving to the front of the green – and neither showed signs of backing down. But everything changed with one swing.

Mickelson was on the par-5 11th green in two, Quinney just short of the bunker. Quinney caught two much ball, however, and it sailed over the green. He chipped back to 15 feet and did well to escape with bogey.

But it was a two-shot swing after Mickelson two-putted for birdie, and Quinney spent the rest of the back nine trying to catch up. Mickelson saved par with a 10-foot putt on No. 15, then made par from about 6 feet on the final hole to keep his lead.

It wasn’t a big lead, not nearly as big as Mickelson wanted. But it was good enough for him.

“Tomorrow we’ll go head-to-head, and if I can just tie him, tie goes to me,” Mickelson said. “So that’s the nice thing about having a shot in hand.”

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